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Magazine
Herbert A. Franke: Photographer of the week

by Yvette Depaepe

Herbert A. Franke  describes himself as a “photographic craftsman”.  Photography is part of his life and he loves to capture beautiful things we all can experience every day.  Herbert continuously aims to increase his skills especially in the category “Abstract & Architecture”.  Let's discover more about this humble but talented photographer and the personality behind his work.

 


“Spiral staircase”


Briefly tell us about yourself, your hobbies and other jobs.
I have learned the profession of industrial clerk. Since 2005 I am retired.
I have been photographing since 1968, but first only to document my holidays.
It was only in the late 70s that I became more seriously involved in photography, when I took classes I at The  Adult Education Center and started to develop my own film and photos.

 


Selfie in the Cinematheque


How has your history and life experiences affected your photography?
In the course of my life, I have been dealing with photography for many decades and my interest and my passion for my hobby has grown, but also my ambition to take good pictures.

 


“Waiting for the bulls”


Which are your most important experiences that have influenced your art?
There are so many other photographers who take fantastic and very good photos. I want to classify my photographic work ,that I love very much and that gives me a lot of joy not necessarily as art. I see myself more as a photographic craftsman. But photography has become part of my life and has also shaped my life in a certain way, in that photography opened my eyes for the beautiful things that we can experience every day. Also, I was a member of a group of artists for 28 years. That time has shaped my photographic work very much.
 


“Bovver”


What first attracted you to photography?
To bring my own vacation pictures home and not to have to buy postcards. In the beginning I had a camera where you had to set time, aperture and focus. Which was not always easy without experience and also led to some disappointments. Then I started to record the set values for every picture and after the film  was developed I had to compare the result with my settings. That was very exciting to analyse, why my picture had become nothing, or why it was good. But I quickly put that on a more secure footing, in that I attended courses at the community college. From then on, it was much easier.

 


“Organ Pipes”


Describe your overall photographic vision.
At the very beginning I developed my films and pictures in my own darkroom. But since changing over to digital photography, I do not have to do that any more. Everything has become so much easier. My photographic work has also developed considerably as a result. No more chemicals in which one must dip ones hands. Above all, I do not have to finish my pictures immediately. The computer gives me the opportunity to say "save as" and the next day I can continue working on my picture. Everything without stress. I do not want to miss the digital photography and image editing any more despite any nostalgia.

 


“Small boy – empty Stadium”


Why are you so drawn by Abstract & Architecture Photography?
At the beginning the travel photography (other countries, other people) was my passion. But at some point, around the year 2006, that changed. During a visit to a Swedish furniture store in Germany, I discovered a motif that fascinated me and I photographed it, and I found that I had succeeded quite well. That was my first "architectural photo". I gave the picture the title "Elk-Blue". It has only one main colour (blue) and few other colours (a little yellow and white). I think that the picture worked so well was due to its composition and the fact that only one dominant colour prevailed. Since that time, architectural photography has been my main topic. The fact that there is so much excellent architecture is above all due to the very good architects who put their visionary and great buildings into this world. If other good motives cross my path, I certainly will not neglect them.

 


“Elk - Blue”


What is more important to you, the mood,/story behind your images or the technical perfection?
I think everything is important. One does not work without the other. A picture should tell a story and also convey a mood. In my field of interest, architecture, technical perfection is absolutely necessary. But if all the other elements have also been addressed, yes, then I would have produced a perfect picture. Unfortunately, I do not always succeed.

 


“Fisherman on Inle Lake”


What generally is your relationship to your subject matter beyond being an observer?
I'm impressed by the great performance of so many great architects. Be it the great work or the details of their works. The fact that these architects have built so many great things gives me the opportunity to photograph my architectural pictures. I love these great architects.

 


“National Gallery of Art”


Do you prepare carefully the locations where you are intending to photograph?
No, not necessarily.  Of course I inform myself before a trip, what interesting architecture is available on site. Since my time is limited, I know that I cannot photograph all motives at once. So you always have a reason to go there again.

 


“World Trade Center (PATH-Station)_2”


What gear do you use (camera, lenses, bag)?
At the moment I am shooting with Canon cameras: EOS 5D Mark II and an EOS 5D Mark IV.  I use Canon lenses: EF24-105mm f / 4L IS II USM, EF16-35mm f / 4L IS USM, EF 100-400mm f / 4.5-5.6l IS, USM. I also use two foreign lenses for my Canon cameras.
A sigma lens: 12-24mm f / 4 DG HSM | Type and a Tamron lens: SP 24-70mm F / 2.8 Di VC USD G2. As a small and lightweight travel tripod I use: togopod

 


“Train Station Lyon - Saint-Exupéry”


Can you tell us something more about your work flow?
To describe my workflow in this interview would go beyond the scope of this interview. But I wrote two tutorials some time ago and sent them to 1x. In those, I'll tell you about the details of the processing of two images. Unfortunately, they have not yet been published.

 


“Musée Unterlinden”

 
What software do you use to process your images?
To edit my pictures I use Adobe Photoshop CC and the Nik-Filter Collection.

 


“Palace of Justice in Vienna”


What is your most important advice to a beginner in Abstract & Architecture Photography and how to start?
Actually, I have no advice.
Everyone seriously interested in photography should take pictures and do everything possible to take good pictures. There are natural talents that can succeed immediately and others need to work very hard to get it right.  I can only advise never to give up.

 


“North Star House/Hamburg”


Who are your favourite photographers and more importantly, how has your appreciation of their work affected how you approach your own photography?  

 


 
"Lloyd's of London"


Is there any specific photo taken by another photographer that has inspired you a lot and why? 
There are many pictures of other photographers that inspire me, and it would be too many to list all of them here.

Are there any specific directions that you would like to take your photography in the future or any specific goals that you wish to achieve?
No, not really. I try to continue to make good architectural images. I also want to continue to participate in contests and I hope to be successful.

Describe your favourite photograph taken by you and why it is special to you?  
Every photo I am working on is my favourite photo. I spend a lot of time thinking about what I want to convey with my photo, and then I try with a good photo from my RAW file to perform that magic. If I need to choose a favourite picture then one of my first digital photos. It is not perfect  but I think it expresses a lot of joy. The title of the picture is "Children playing in Dubrovnik".

 


“Children playing in Dubrovnik”


Is there anything else you wish to add  and what do you think about 1X as a home base for your work
?
I am very much at home at 1x. This forum has many very good photographers whose pictures I like to watch and from which I can learn a lot for my own photography.
Here I would like to voice a little criticism. What I do not like so much is the method of curation. There, a consistent process should be established. The images should be curated in a timely manner, for example photographs will be accepted or rejected after a set time and not vary from two days for one image, and another one will take a week or more to be accepted or rejected.

I would like to thank you, dear Yvette, for the confidence placed in me and this interview.

 


“Ciudad de las Artes (Valencia)”

  

Write
Congratulations. This is so well deserved! I have been following your work for quite some time and am very pleased to see your work showcased on 1x. Truly amazing!
LIeber Herbert Deine Arbeit überzeugt auf sehr hohem Niveau. Ich bin ein grosser Fan Deines Schaffens und stets beeindruckt, wie Du neue Kompositionen findest und diese meisterhaft bearbeitest - Prädikat: Solides Handwerk! Danke für den spannenden Einblick in Deinen photographischen Alltag. Ich wünsche Dir besinnliche Weihnachtstage und weiterhin viel Freude auch hier bei 1x.com! Thanks a lot as well to Yvette for this intersting Interview about a very successful photographer within our community and beyond!
Thanks Andreas! I fully agree that Herbert deserves to be featured!
I like very much the work of Herbert, geometry, framing and often one or more characters in the picture to remind us that we are not in fiction well hand in a real architecture of our modern world. Thank you Herbert for making us dream and thank you Yvette for this excellent interview !!!
You're welcome, dear Thierry!
Herzlichen Glückwunsch! War überfällig!
Vielen Dank, Hans Peter. Ich habe mich sehr über Deine freundlichen Worte gefreut. Auch Dir wünsche ich besinnliche Weihnachtstage und ein gutes Neues Jahr. Gruß Herbert
Lieber Herbert, gratuliere Dir herzlich zum Fotograf der Woche - eine verdiente Anerkennung Deiner großartigen Arbeit. Liebe Grüße Ute
Liebe Ute, ich danke Dir ganz herzlich für Deine lobenden Worte und Deine Anerkennung. Ich wünsche Dir und Deiner Familie eine frohe und besinnliche Weihnachtszeit und alles gute für das Neue Jahr. Liebe Grüße Herbert
Auch von mir einen herzlichen Glückwunsch zu dieser schönen Gelegenheit eines Rückblicks, Herbert. Ich bin schon vor Jahren über deine Arbeiten bei 500px gestolpert, lange vor 1x, und vielleicht hast du mich sogar zu dem ein oder anderen Foto inspiriert.
Ganz herzlichen Dank, Mike, für Deine freundliche Anerkennung und Deinen herzlichen Glückwunsch. Wenn es wirklich so wäre, dass Du Dich von mir inspiriert fühltest, würde mich das sehr freuen. Da macht dann die Fotografie doppelt so viel Spass. Ich wünsche Dir und allen die Dir lieb sind, eine frohe Weihnachtszeit und alles gute im Neuen Jahr. Gruß Herbert
gratuliere Dir zu diesem schon längst fälligen Artikel. Deine grafisch geprägten Bilder sind eine Bereicherung von 1x.com. Lieben Gruß Wolfgang Many thanks also to Yvette for presentation of this interview
Thanks for your appreciation again, dear Hans-Wolfgang ;-)
Ichfreue mich, dass ich als Fotograf der Woche von Yvette ausgewählt wurde und meine Bilder und mich vorstellen darf. Dir, Hans-Wolfgang, danke ich ganz herzlich für Deine lobende Anerkennung und den Glückwunsch. Ich wünsche Dir und Deinen Lieben, ein besinnliches Weihnachtsfest und ein gutes Neues Jahr. Herzliche Grüße
Herzlichen Glückwunsch zu dieser schon lange verdienten Auszeichnung!
Danke, lieber Udo. Ich danke Dir und freue mich über Deinen Glückwunsch. Ich wünsche Dir und Deinen Lieben ein frohes und besinnliches Weihnachtsfest und alles gute im Neuen Jahr. LG Herbert
Congratulations Herbert ..I have been following your work since past 3 years and your architectural images and vision are a continued source of inspiration...It was great reading your interview ! A well written and presented interview Yvette .
Thanks for your appreciation, dear Rana! All honour goes to Herbert, of course ;-)
Dear Rana, yes I am glad that I was selected as a photographer the week of Yvette and allowed to introduce my pictures and myself. Thank you very much for your loyalty and friendship here in the forum of 1x. Thanks also for your nice words. I wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Best regards Herbert
Herzlichen Glückwunsch, Herbert zu dieser großartigen Präsentation. Gruß Brigitte
Hanz lieben Dank, Brigitte, für Deine freundliche Anerkennung. Ich freue mich sehr. Gruß Herbert Ich wünsche Dir und Deiner Familie, frohe und besinnliche Weihnachtstage und ein gutes Neues Jahr.
Fine interview and excellent work, dear Herbert! Congratulations and many thanks for your fine collaboration. Cheers, Yvette
Dear Yvette, Thank you very much, for your effort, that you have made this interview with me and also for the trust placed in me. I am very pleased that you have chosen me as a photographer of the week. Thank you Best regards Herbert
All pleasure is mine, Herbert! You fully deserve to be the Photographer of the Week. I'm so glad you have a lot of response and I knew you would!!!
Thank you so much, Yvette. I wish you a happy and merry Christmas and all the best, especially health, in the New Year 2019. best regards Herbert
Memories, moments, timelesness

by Editor  Swapnil.

When cameras were first invented, they were used as medium and a way to store memories. People wanted a record of their life so that they could go through the prints and reminisce the happy times they once had. As time passed by, cameras became easier to handle and more affordable for masses.  More and more events were captured and stored right from the film days to the digital days.

From the past till now,  photography has probably seen the most changes compared to any Art form. From film to digital, from mirror sensors to mirror-less.  Each half a decade we have seen huge changes sweeping by.

 


“The bond between us...” by Charlaine Gerber


What certainly didn't change is the soul of the art form neither the reason why pictures are actually captured.

The memories, the moments, the timelessness … Everyone has its own reasons to capture “moments”. Pictures are often stories that the authors want to convey.
The story of the subject, the story of the moment, the story about how the photographer sees the scene. Therefore, it's right to say that we must not shoot what it is, but shoot how it feels.  Feeling is the real story of a picture.
 


“party ended” by storytaylor

 

"The State of Being Strong” by Mike Melnotte


In all the genres of photography, pictures that convey a story are the ones which are the most appreciated. The concept behind the picture is as important as the quality (exposure, image quality and beauty). All great photographers agree that the greatest images, even taken with cell phones, convey a story in the purest way.

 


"Sadness” by Edith Hoffman

 


“The choice to make” by Victoria Ivanova


Reading a picture can sometimes be like reading a whole if we have are digging deep enough. The most iconic and timeless are the images which have made a long-lasting impression on our minds.  Striking examples are photographs taking made during world war II.  Or the ones taken in Vietnam or Somalia showing malnutrition and the refugee crisis from the last years.

Sports photography and event photography are other genres where we can see lots of stories or timeless. The common thing behind all of them is again the story.

 


“Dialogue of two worlds” by MIKHAIL POTAPOV

 


“The Revolution” by Amin Roshan Afshar


As normal photographers we don’t have the access to special moments as they are considered reportage or journalistic kind of work. But even then, a simple landscape photo can portray a story about the land or the times it has been through. 

Wildlife photography also has myriad of opportunities to create stories, which can be easily assimilated to some feedback about the subject.

Portrait photography can open up a world about the person portrayed in one single image.

Stories always will keep people attracted to photography. Of the zillions of images posted daily on the social media, the special ones will be the ones which have a soul. 

Ansel Adams said: “Nothing can be worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept.”

It’s easy nowadays to be technically brilliant, but it much more difficult to convey true feelings and emotions behind pictures.

Enjoy this brilliant collection of timeless storytelling images from 1x photographers.

 


“Couple” by Izidor Gasperlin

 


“Rugby” by Cesar March

 


“Adu Panco” by Adhi Prayoga

 


“...tired... by rudolf wungkana

 


n/t by Paulo Medeiros

 


“Yellow glove” by Jan Scheunders

 


“rush hour” by swapnil.

 


“façonnable" by Marc Apers

 


“Biggles” by Warren Joyce

 


“Eye to Eye – Elk fight” by Jim Cumming

 


“The heart of a knight” by Victoria Ivanova

 


“War Fashion” by Tal Flint

 


“An Irish Airman Foresees His Death” by Michael Bilotta

 


“Fire I National Park of Cilento” by Antonio Grambone

 


“rice” by Ümmü Nisan Kandilcioglu

 


“Perisani village” by Julien Oncete

 


“Portrait of an old woman” by Julien Oncete

 

“The visit" by  Jose C. Lobato

 


“Children of Kathmandu” by Yvette Depaepe

 


“Soft is the heart of a child...” by Yvette Depaepe

 


“All for one” by Ekkachai Khemkum

 


“in my garden...” by Magdalena Russocka

 


“The wait” by Gus

 

Write
Inspiring set of images selected and very well written article..Thanks to Editorial Team for sharing !
Beautiful photo work and article ... thank you for sharing!!
Fantastic article, superb images, congratuletions Swapnil!
Oh wow, what a fantastic article, well done Swapnil and Yvette, and thank you kindly for using my photo, it is a huge compliment!
Magnificent work and beautiful photographs. Thank you very much for Yvette and for Swapnil. Greetings to all and Merry Christmas.
Excellent selection of works, with pleasure looked at them again. Thanks to editors Swapnil and Yvette! Friends, I wish you all a great weekend!
Thanks mikhail!!!
Great article and great choice of photos ... thank you Swapnil:-)
Thanks a lot luc!
Thanks!!
great article, I enjoyed your reading, thanks also for including one of my images, congratsfor the work

all the best Gus

Thanks gus!
Nice selection of images. An interesting article. I do agree with this "It’s easy nowadays to be technically brilliant, but it much more difficult to convey true feelings and emotions behind pictures."
Thanks david!
Fine interview and excellent work, dear Herbert! Congratulations and many thanks for your fine collaboration. Cheers, Yvette
Dear Yvette, Thank you very much, for your effort, that you have made this interview with me and also for the trust placed in me. I am very pleased that you have chosen me as a photographer of the week. Thank you Best regards Herbert
All pleasure is mine, Herbert! You fully deserve to be the Photographer of the Week. I'm so glad you have a lot of response and I knew you would!!!
Thank you so much, Yvette. I wish you a happy and merry Christmas and all the best, especially health, in the New Year 2019. best regards Herbert
Some things you have to know when photographing 'Hummingbirds'

by Leigh Pelton

The hummingbird's wings can beat up to 80 times per second. To the human eye and sometimes in the captured picture, the wings are just a blur. It is the major feature that imposes the difficulty in the task of photographing this amazing bird.


Nikon D800  .  Nikkor 70-200mmf/2.8  .  1/60s.  f/5.6  .  ISO100
 
 
Hummingbirds photographed in flight can be quite stunning but a challenge because of their extremely rapid movements. However, I have found that they are territorials (i.e., they tend to feed, breed and nest in a relatively small area), and a pattern exists in their hourly movements, usually from one food source to another and eventually back again. Therefore, if you position yourself near a food source with your camera ready, the hummingbird will eventually return, and you should be ready to make the picture.

"Therefore, the hummingbird will usually return to where you are sitting every 15 to 20 minutes."

Unfortunately, the relatively small area can be large enough that the time between visits back to where you are situated can be longer than you might wish. I am fortunate in that I live within a two-hour drive of a hummingbird enclosure at the Tucson Desert Museum in southern Arizona, USA. This place is quite large and heavily landscaped, but it restricts the routine of any hummingbird to a smaller area. Therefore, the hummingbird will usually return to where you are sitting every 15 to 20 minutes. 

The next issue is the hummingbird’s feeding habits. Some will stick their beak into a flower or feeder, drink for a while and then go away. Others will drink for a bit, pull back, hover briefly and then re-approach the food source to drink again, sometimes repeating this action three or four times. This is the kind of individual that you want — the type that poses for you between feedings.

"For the wings to reverse direction they have to first come to a complete stop. It is during this moment that they present the longest image duration to the camera sensor."

For camera settings I have found that without using a flash, a shutter speed of 1/4000 second will generally freeze the wings. Depending on what the hummingbird is doing, a much slower shutter speed may do as well. Also, you may want some movement to convey action. For this picture, I used a hot shoe flash and set the shutter speed to 1/60 second for synchronization. The flash was set on TTL mode. For the wings to reverse direction they have to first come to a complete stop. It is during this moment that they present the longest image duration to the camera sensor. The flash added a brief burst of additional light, and the wings were frozen by that light in the front. The ambient light during the lapse of the exposure revealed the wings as they moved behind the bird's body. The ambient light also exposed the body of the bird during this time, thereby creating the somewhat transparent appearance of the forward wings. The shot was handheld to allow rapid repositioning as the bird moved about his food source.

"Returning from my very first trip to the Desert Museum, I was amazed at how many shots I had taken (maybe three hundred) and how few usable captures I had acquired."

Returning from my very first trip to the Desert Museum, I was amazed at how many shots I had taken (maybe three hundred) and how few usable captures I had acquired. Searching on the internet to find out how other photographers did it, I discovered that they do exactly the same thing; they take hundreds of shots and get only a few that have aesthetic value. This, of course, improves with experience, but I'm usually prepared to spend a full day to improve my chances.
 
POST PROCESSING
The image was captured in the Nikon RAW format (NEF) and was processed in Adobe Camera Raw, Photoshop CS6 and OnOne Software's Perfect Resize. I also used some Nik Software plugins: DFine 2, Color Efex Pro 4 and Sharpener Pro 3.

1) Adobe Camera Raw was used to lighten the shadows and reduce the highlights. The Clarity tool was used to increase the local contrast within the midtones of the image. 

2) The adjusted RAW image was saved in the TIFF file format and opened in Photoshop CS6. Because I wanted to treat the subject and background in a differential way, the use of layers available in Photoshop CS6 made this much easier. 

3) The next step was to crop the image. The Crop tool in Photoshop CS6 displays a variety of compositional guides. My favorite is the Golden Spiral (Fibonacci Spiral). Unfortunately, it is only suitable for certain subjects since it tends to position the subject close to the edges. Here, since the focal point of the subject was his eye, it would have shoved his back wings off the right side of the frame. I wanted a close-up composition, and I wanted to show the back wings. As a result, none of the guides seemed to help, so I was left with merely my own compositional judgment. 

4) I applied the Nik Dfine 2 plugin. This reduces noise that might be present, and I typically use it as a routine in my workflow, especially if I've done substantial cropping. 

5) I used the program Perfect Resize (by OnOne Software) to resize the image back to the pixel dimensions needed for a 16×20 inch print, in a new layer.

6) A flower stem that partially blocked the view of the bird was removed in Photoshop CS6 (my camera bag now contains a small pair of clippers), using the Quick Selection tool and the Content-Aware Fill feature. I did this in small sections of the image to keep the “Content Aware” as local as possible. After that, I further cleaned up the photo using the Clone Stamp tool around a 75% Opacity setting for smoother results.

7) I opened the image in Nik Color Efex Pro 4 plugin. Here, I applied Color Contrast filter in a new layer to accentuate the colors of the hummingbird. Then, I added another layer using the Tonal Contrast filter to adjust the Highlights, Midtones and Shadows. This can all be done on only one layer, but I prefer to do this separately so that I can adjust the Opacity settings of each of these layers, if needed. I tend to overdo each of these effects when I'm in Nik Software and then reduce the amount of the effects when I'm back in Photoshop CS6, using the Opacity slider for each one of these layers. It's easier to reduce the effects of the Nik filters in Photoshop than it is to go back into the Nik plugins and increase them.

8) Satisfied with the result, I added a white layer mask to the top layer and painted black on the mask over the background area to block out those previous adjustments. I only wanted it applied to the hummingbird. 

9) I created a new combined layer (Ctrl/Cmd+Alt+Shift+E) to preserve the previous layers. Then, I inverted the layer mask from the previous layer created in Step 8 and applied this masking to the new combined layer. This action allowed me to mask the hummingbird and make changes to the background without affecting the bird. 

10) The background was extremely busy and tended to compete with the subject. But I wanted to keep some of the detail of the environment since the hummingbird with his double set of wings looked a bit like a fairy in a garden. Also, I like to give the viewer more to look at than just the main subject. I think it's important to let the viewer enjoy the main subject, wander around the environment a little and then return to the main subject. To do this, I added a Curves adjustment layer. Here I lowered mainly the midtones until I achieved a lower brightness relative to the hummingbird. 

11) I added another combined layer (Ctrl/Cmd+Alt+Shift+E) to apply a blur filter to this new layer. I re-masked the bird and applied the Gaussian Blur (Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur). Other blur tools may do as well or better, but I have a slight preference for Gaussian. Here I adjusted the blur to my suiting.

12) I saved all of these adjustments as a “master” copy, then flattened all of the layers (merging them) and saved the image as a “flattened” copy. I like to keep both, the master and the flattened copy, in separate files in case I have to make changes later.

13) Sharpening was the final step. Sometimes I only apply it to the main subject in my flattened file, via masking, but in this case it wasn't necessary because the background was blurred sufficiently. I used the Local Contrast filter in the Nik Sharpener Pro 3 tool menu. This is a relatively mild sharpener and presents less of that unattractive, gritty look to those people who like to pixel dive.
 
TIPS
For me, there are two important tips for nature and wildlife photography:
1) Know your subject's behavior patterns.
2) Be patient.
 
BIOGRAPHY
I live in the greater Phoenix area in southern Arizona. In my day job I'm an aerospace engineer working on the space side of things; however, I've always been fascinated by animals. So, when my interest in photography returned with the emergence of the digital cameras, wildlife and nature photography became a logical mix.

I started with a Nikon Coolpix, then changed to a Nikon D70 DSLR, followed by a D700 and currently I use a D800. With the purchasing of the D70 I began reading as much as possible about digital photography and photography in general and acquired the software Photoshop Elements. Starting with this program I began the long road of learning software skills, which is an art in itself. I'm now semi-proficient in Photoshop CS6.
Write
so beautiful!
Thank you so much, Carmine! Leigh
I doubt whether i will ever have the opportunity to photograph a humming bird, but i really enjoyed reading your post. Esspecially the workflow description i like a lot! Thanks for sharing.
Thank you Wicherbos! But you don't have hummingbirds in the Netherlands? Leigh
Perhaps in a zoo, not sure... never seen these beautiful creatures...
Perfect sample article, dear Leigh !! By the way, if you are using a flash, have you tried a longer shutter speed and synced it to the back curtain (rear) ? I think with your patience, you can achieve an interesting effect. Thank you Leigh, thanks you Yvette !!
Thank you my good friend, Vladimir. I appreciate your comments and suggestions. Leigh
Beautiful image and interesting info about the behaviour of these amazing little birds, Leigh. Congratulations, my friend. Cheers, Yvette
Thank you so very much Yvette. I appreciate that. Leigh
Magnificent work and beautiful photographs. Thank you very much for Yvette and for Swapnil. Greetings to all and Merry Christmas.
Excellent selection of works, with pleasure looked at them again. Thanks to editors Swapnil and Yvette! Friends, I wish you all a great weekend!
Thanks mikhail!!!
Great article and great choice of photos ... thank you Swapnil:-)
Thanks a lot luc!
Thanks!!
great article, I enjoyed your reading, thanks also for including one of my images, congratsfor the work

all the best Gus

Thanks gus!
Nice selection of images. An interesting article. I do agree with this "It’s easy nowadays to be technically brilliant, but it much more difficult to convey true feelings and emotions behind pictures."
Thanks david!
Fine interview and excellent work, dear Herbert! Congratulations and many thanks for your fine collaboration. Cheers, Yvette
Dear Yvette, Thank you very much, for your effort, that you have made this interview with me and also for the trust placed in me. I am very pleased that you have chosen me as a photographer of the week. Thank you Best regards Herbert
All pleasure is mine, Herbert! You fully deserve to be the Photographer of the Week. I'm so glad you have a lot of response and I knew you would!!!
Thank you so much, Yvette. I wish you a happy and merry Christmas and all the best, especially health, in the New Year 2019. best regards Herbert
Winners Contest 'ROME'

The contest about the eternal city 'ROME'  apparantly was a diificult topic.  Not as much submissions as usual, but all of them great photographs taken in the capital of Italy.
Enjoy this gallery of the 10 best images.

The winners with the most votes are: 
1st place:   MJoão Ferreira
2nd place:  Jose C. Lobato
3rd place:  Heinz Hieke

Congratulations!
Thanks to everybody who participated to the contest 'Rome'.

"When the world rings in 2019"  is or currently theme running.
Very soon now the whole world will ring in 2019.  New Year's Eve festivities have kicked off around the world, as people toast to the beginning of 2019 everywhere. Show us how the end of 2018 plays out in your country as the clock strikes midnight. All over the globe, TIME will be streaming the celebrations, which include party's, fireworks and more iconic events.
Show your creativity and submit
 your best images from how you will toast to the beginning of a New Year.

The contest 'When the world rings in 219' will end at midnight on Sunday the 23rd of December.  The sooner you upload your images, the more chance you have to gather the most votes.
If you haven't uploaded your photo yet, you can do it  here
 


1st place: MJ João Ferreira - "Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome"

 


2nd place: Jose C. Lobato

 


3rd place: Heinz Hieke

 

HONORABLE MENTIONS


by Fabiola Amidei

 


by Ralf Schoppe

 


by Torsten Hermann

 


by Nicodemo Quaglia

 


by Antonio Perrone

 


by Marianne Siff Kusk

 


by Udo Dittmann

 

Write
Congrats to all !
Congratulations to all other winners and thanks a lot to all who voted for my photo. Cheers, Maria João.
Congrats to all winners and participants !!!
Amazing shots! I like Udo's one especially! Congrats to all!
Congratulations to all!
Great images; congratulations to all!
congrats to all !
Congratulations to the winners and honorable mentions. Thanks to everybody who participated. As 2019 soon will knock on our doors, we hope to see many submissions to the currently running theme: 'When the World rings in the New Year'. Cheers, Yvette
Thank you so much, Yvette!
great article, I enjoyed your reading, thanks also for including one of my images, congratsfor the work

all the best Gus

Thanks gus!
Nice selection of images. An interesting article. I do agree with this "It’s easy nowadays to be technically brilliant, but it much more difficult to convey true feelings and emotions behind pictures."
Thanks david!
Fine interview and excellent work, dear Herbert! Congratulations and many thanks for your fine collaboration. Cheers, Yvette
Dear Yvette, Thank you very much, for your effort, that you have made this interview with me and also for the trust placed in me. I am very pleased that you have chosen me as a photographer of the week. Thank you Best regards Herbert
All pleasure is mine, Herbert! You fully deserve to be the Photographer of the Week. I'm so glad you have a lot of response and I knew you would!!!
Thank you so much, Yvette. I wish you a happy and merry Christmas and all the best, especially health, in the New Year 2019. best regards Herbert
Alessandro Traverso: Photographer of the week

by Yvette Depaepe

For Alessandro Traverso  photography is pure Art. He calls himself a beginner in spite of the great photographs to be seen in his portfolio.  Alessandro continuously strives to improve his skills.  He succeeds in a wonderful way through his work to show us his photographic commitment, passion and desire to reflect his inner personality.  All  his images are a reflection of his soul.  Let's go through this interview to discover much more about the man behind his work.  Enjoy ...

 


“The Dance of the Sea”


Briefly tell us about yourself, your hobbies and other jobs, Alessandro.
I’m 60 years old and I was born in Genova, the city were I still live.
I graduated in political sciences, I’m married with Orietta with whom I share my passion for photography. I’ve got two sons.
In my youth I worked as a mechanic, I taught for a few years juridical and economic topics at school and in the last few decades I managed portfolio investments as a bank employee.
I retired one year in advance from my job, therefore I can now dedicate more time to my favourite hobby. Photography, of course.
I’m not particularly good in expressing myself with words but hope my photographs will tell a bit more about who I am ;-)

 


“Poppies”


How has your history and life experiences affected your photography? Which are your most important experiences that has influenced your art?
Since my youth I was attracted by figurative arts.
I was quite good with pencil drawing, charcoal drawing and so on, but I have no predisposition for music or music instruments.
When I was in my 20s I had my first camera, a Reflex Zenit E, and learned the basics of photography. I made some shots but I didn’t develop the films myself.
In those days I wasn’t so involved in this hobby, in fact I gave it up for quite some time.
5 years ago I bought a Reflex digital camera a new world opened up to me with all the digital advantages: lesser expensive, more practical and moreover the endless possibilities to express myself by file processing.
I was attracted again by photography especially since I was aware of upcoming eye problems.  Luckily I still have a good eyesight but I don't take it for granted.
Photography stimulates me to observe carefully everything that I find beautiful in my surroundings.

 


“Alpe di Siusi”

 


“Island”


Can you describe your overall photographic vision?
The digital camera and many PC tools through which we can express ourselves regardless of the different genres of photography are really important.
For me photography is an art.  Behind each photograph there is something well-defined, planned or not, but it may not show lack of commitment, passion, or the desire to reflect the inner person.  A piece of the author’s soul has to be seen by the viewers.

Why are you so drawn by landscape photography?
Because you are in contact with nature, because it gives you the opportunity to visit distant places of incredible beauty but above all to rediscover the beauty of nearby places that are otherwise not sufficiently appreciated.
I am lucky to live in Liguria, a rugged land between the mountains and the sea, whose charm I discovered recently since I took up with photography again.

 


“Camogli”


What is more important to you, the mood,/story behind your images or the technical perfection?
Technique is essential to achieve the final result, but the true purpose is to create an image whose visual impact hits the viewer in a stimulating way.
I think that a photograph should be seen in its entirety and the three elements mentioned above must coexist in harmony.
The ones that think they have reached perfection have come to an end of their journey, they aren’t spurred to explore other roads.  And I’m still very far away from thinking that I reached perfection!
A picture always has to tell a story, even though it is more or less important according to the different genres.
As an example, I like to mention the well-known photograph winning the World Press 2016, “Hope for a new life” by Warren Richardson.
In this case the mood and above all the story told hit hard the observer, despite the technical quality of the shot.

What generally is your relationship to your subject matter beyond being an observer?
A subject I love shooting are lightnings.
They are pure energy that is unleashed when and where you cannot know.
The naked eye cannot catch but a glimpse of all those details, but the lens of the camera can catch every single one of them. With a little bit of experience and luck.
I want to communicate a little bit of that strength, of that energy that in an instant expresses itself in such violent and dramatic way.
We aren’t just observers, we are part of the mystery of the existence and being aware of that, it helps to establish an empathic relationship with what we photograph. 

 


“Electric Atmosphere”


Do you prepare carefully the locations where you are intending to photograph?
If possible I visit multiple times the location I intend to photograph especially if these places are close enough to home.
Particular weather and light conditions are essential for good results, therefore I consult the weather forecasts while waiting for good opportunities such as storms.
However, I don’t think it’s possible to foresee everything, in fact many times exploration, chance, and luck are important parts of our hobby.
As for travelling, I am very lazy and I’m afraid of planning.  Booking flights and accommodations already stresses me out but, fortunately, my wife is very organized and she takes care of all that. I'm grateful to her and it makes me very happy to travel and to be able to experience the thrill of photographing places of extraordinary beauty.

 


“Vik, impressions of a harsh and beautiful ...”

 


“Homage to the Sea”


What gear do you use (camera, lenses, bag)?
I’ve got a Pentax K3II but I use mainly a Pentax DA HD 16-85mm f/3.5-5.6 ED DC WR.
I'm using rarely the Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM, the Samyang 16mm f/2.0 ED, the Pentax A SMC 50mm f/2.8 macro, the Pentax SMC D-FA 100mm f2.8 macro WR.
Further more, I have a Manfrotto tripod and a Tamrac bag.

What software do you use to process your images?
I take my shots exclusively in Raw and I work first with Lightroom and then Gimp, if I consider it useful.

Can you tell us something more about your work flow?
When shooting I thinking meanly about the composition and the right moment to capture the best light. For example, for sunrises or sunsets, the intensity, temperature and colours change quickly and therefore it is important not to lose the moment by taking many shots.
I don’t imagine the scene to be in colours or in b/w while shooting, I decide about that during the editing process.
I start with Lightroom and depending of what the photo suggests,  I intervene differently on the lights, on the shadows, on the white balance, on the brightness and intensity of the individual colours, on the sharpness and so on.
In some cases I create several versions of a same image in Lightroom and then add them as different levels in Gimp.

 


“Sunrise at Sella pass (Dolomites)


What is your most important advice to a beginner in landscape photography and how do you get started?
Despite my age, I consider myself more as a beginner and don't think I'm a specialist in landscape photography.
However I would say that it needs much perseverance to find the best light conditions and take advantage of them besides the basic knowledge of photographic rules.
You must be prepared to get up early in the morning and to walk with backpacks and tripods on your shoulders.
It also is important to have the necessary gear in order to deal with rain or splashes from a stormy sea and other bad weather conditions.
It also is essential to observe and “read” many well-crafted photos to refine your own aesthetic sense, even if the most important thing is to cultivate this hobby with the right amount of passion and determination without setting limits of any kind.  Just experiment all.

 


“Fog”


Who are your favourite photographers and more importantly, how has your appreciation of their work affected how you approach your own photography?
I was impressed by Salgado’s Genesis project.
It’s a project out of the ordinary for breath and purpose: «to rejoin the world as it was before man changed it almost to disfigure it».

But, before visiting the exhibition, the thing which left me perplexed was his decision to show the extraordinary and wild beauty of the planet Earth exclusively in BW.
It seemed impossible to captivate and engage the viewers without using colours.
Apparently I was wrong.
I would like to say that I’m inspired daily by the many artists who publish their works on 1x.
I will not name them because I don't want to take the risk to forget some.
When a photograph really hits me I save it and often reconsider it and ultimately I reopen the gallery of the author to appreciate it even more.
So, my aesthetic sense is mainly influenced by watching inspiring photographs.

 


“Storm in Tellaro”


Is there any specific photo taken by another photographer that has inspired you a lot and why?

I don’t know, choosing one in particular is difficult for me, there are simply so many...

Are there any specific directions that you would like to take your photography in the future or any specific goals that you wish to achieve?
I would like to print some photos and show them in a personal or collective exhibition.
Apart from that I just hope to keep improving. Photography is giving me unexpected satisfactions, last but not least this interview.

 


“Friend”

 


“Sunset at Plougrescant”


Describe your favourite photograph taken by you and why it is special to you?
The photo I care about the most is... the next!
Speaking more seriously, my favourite is certainly my first photo published on 1x. The satisfaction and the excitement when I first saw it published helped me to commit myself to new shots with even more enthusiasm.
The subject of that photo, lightning, is a theme dear to me as previously said.

 


 
"Lightning in the dark"
 

Is there anything else you wish to add and what do you think about 1X as a home base for your work?
To get published on 1x is not easy. But it’s precisely the selection made by the official curators that distinguishes it from other photography sites and that helps to grow and to reconsider our approach to photography.
I like a lot that the originality and possible artistic value – besides the technical aspect – is taken into consideration.
The variety and quality level of the published photos are very high.  I am proud and almost incredulous to have my photographs next to the masterpieces of so many good friends.

A big thank you also to the wonderful work done by Senior Critics, to you Yvette and to all the staff!
Last but not least, I want to thank my two sons Riccardo and Dario for their help on this translation.

 


“Free”
Write
Great shots, great photographer, great interview. Thanks Alesandro, thanks Yvette !!! Is it possible to put all the interviews (photographer of the week) in one place, which was an opportunity to return to them and reread?
Thank you very much Vladimir for your nice comment! By clicking 1x, then "magazine" and below categories you will find "photographers of the week". Have a nice day :)
Thanks Alessandro. I found what I wanted :-)
Complimenti.
Grazie mille Massimo! Thank you very much Massimo! Greetings!
Che gioia Alessandro, felice di conoscerti meglio. Complimenti di cuore per il meritatissimo e straordinario risultato raggiunto, con una galleria fotografica come la tua questo riconoscimento era inevitabile!!!! Splendida la tua intervista e bravissima come sempre Yvette. Un caro saluto Nico.
Le tue parole mi fanno immenso piacere Nico! Le tue foto sono e sono sempre state per me motivo d'ispirazione e al tuo giudizio ci tengo in modo particolare. A presto per tuoi nuovi successi!!! Ciao Ale.
Beautiful gallery !! Congratulations Alessandro !! Great interview and articles!!
Thank you very much for your appreciation Teruhiko!!! Greetings!
Congratulazioni Alessandro ! Davvero meritato bravo bravo bravo :-)
Che piacere la tua visita Enrico! Grazie mille!!!! Thank you very much!!! Ciao :)
Fantastic story, and brilliant photos, my congratulations Alessandro, I am a huge fan :) ! Wonderful article, thank you so much Yvette!
Thank you very much for your appreciation Marek!!! Greetings! :))
Thanks, Marek... I'm grateful to Alessandro !!!
Inspiring work ..really wonderful images !! Congratulations Alessandro ..A well written interview Yvette
Thank you very much Rana Jabeen! Greetings! :)
Honours go to Alessandro, Rana! His sons did a great job helping with the translation ;-). Thanks for your appreciation, dear friend...
I really appreciate your work, they are inspirational. Deserved award. Congrats. Alessandro. Excellent article, Yvette.
Thank you for your appreciation, Fabrizio!
Thank you very much Fabrizio for your nice comment! Greetings, ciao Ale.
A very nice interview I read with immense pleasure... many compliments Alessandro, for this well deserved first page, you're very good and your wonderful works prove it !!! And thanks to Yvette for her valuable work !!!
Heartfelt thanks, Fabiola ;-)
Thank you very much Fabiola for your nice comment! Greetings :)))
Beautiful article, thank you Yvette and thank you Alessandro for sharing your experiences. Truly inspiring!
Thank you very much Roxana for your nice comment! :-) Greetings!
Thanks, dear Roxana!
complimenti Alessandro.... W Genova !
W Genova Alfredo! Grazie mille mi fa molto piacere sentirti! Thnak you very much Alfreado! :)
Congrats Alessandro, your work is splendid, thank Yvette for this superb interview !!!
Thank you very much Thierry, greetings!!!
Thank you, Thierry ;-)
Apprezzo molto i tuoi lavori , complimenti Alessandro, meritato !! exellent article , Yvette
Grazie mille Carmine, a questo sito devo molto, a cominciare da te! Thank you very much! :-)
Thanks, dear Carmine!
Ciao Alessandro, great gallery and well deserved article, congrats :)
Grazie mille Luca! Thnak you very much ! :-)
Congratulazioni Alessandro! Meritatissimo riconoscimento. Ciao Gian
Grazie mille Gian!!! Una cosa davvero insperata che mi rende felice :)
Congratulations with your interview as Photographer of the week, Alessandro! Many thanks for your fine collaboration, my friend. Cheers, Yvette
Many thanks to you, Yvette, for your great work and this wonderful opportunity for me! And it's even published on my birthday! :-) I wish you the best Alessandro Traverso
Wow, a double treat ;-) What a coincidence... I wish you the best of Birthdays and lots of photographic pleasure in the future. Hugs, Yvette